About Help

Choose a topic from the list on the left or search for a specific topic. Choose a topic from the list or search for a specific topic.
Cmdlets  Providers
 

about_join

Join

 

SHORT DESCRIPTION

    Describes how the join operator (-join) combines multiple strings into a  
    single string. 
 
 

LONG DESCRIPTION

    The join operator concatenates a set of strings into a single string. The 
    strings are appended to the resulting string in the order that they appear 
    in the command.  
 
 
  Syntax 
      The following diagram shows the syntax for the join operator. 
 
         -Join <String[]> 
        <String[]> -Join <Delimiter> 
 
 
  Parameters 
      String[] 
          Specifies one or more strings to be joined. 
 
 
      Delimiter 
          Specifies one or more characters placed between the concatenated strings. 
          The default is no delimiter (""). 
 
 
  Remarks 
      The unary join operator (-join <string[]>) has higher precedence than 
      a comma. As a result, if you submit a comma-separated list of strings to 
      the unary join operator, only the first string (before the first comma)  
      is submitted to the join operator. 
 
 
      To use the unary join operator, enclose the strings in parentheses, or 
      store the strings in a variable, and then submit the variable to join. 
 
 
      For example: 
 
          -join "a", "b", "c" 
          a 
          b 
          c 
 
          -join ("a", "b", "c") 
          abc 
 
 
          $z = "a", "b", "c" 
          -join $z 
          abc 
 
 
  Examples 
      The following statement joins three strings: 
 
 
          -join ("Windows", "PowerShell", "2.0") 
          WindowsPowerShell2.0 
 
 
      The following statement joins three strings delimited by a space: 
 
 
          "Windows", "PowerShell", "2.0" -join " " 
          Windows PowerShell 2.0 
 
 
      The following statements use a multiple-character delimiter to join  
      three strings: 
 
 
          $a = "WIND", "SP", "ERSHELL"  
          $a -join "OW" 
          WINDOWSPOWERSHELL 
 
 
      The following statement joins the lines in a here-string into 
      a single string. Because a here-string is one string, the lines in the 
      here-string must be split before they can be joined. You can use this  
      method to rejoin the strings in an XML file that has been saved in a  
      here-string: 
 
 
          $a = @' 
          a 
          b 
          c 
          '@ 
 
          (-split $a) -join " " 
          a b c 
 
 

SEE ALSO

about_Operators
about_Comparison_Operators
about_Split