Posts Tagged ‘PowerShell GUI’


 

Write a Multi-Form PowerShell GUI App

Tuesday, July 26th, 2016 by June Blender
Tested on: PowerShell 2.0+, PowerShell Studio 2016 This step-by-step example shows you how to create a very simple multi-form PowerShell GUI app. The app consists of a parent form that gets data from a child form and displays it. When you finish, you'll know how to use the basic multi-form features of PowerShell Studio. For details about how these features work under the covers, see How Do Multi-Form Projects Work? For this task, we assume that you know how to create a single-form PowerShell GUI app or that you've participated in a Thinking in Events hands-on lab. Otherwise, start with…   More »

My First Form: New Videos for PowerShell GUI Beginners

Monday, March 14th, 2016 by June Blender
Like most things, once you know the basics, it's really easy to build GUI applications with Windows PowerShell and PowerShell Studio. And, like most things, it's hard to learn the basics. We're here to help. We just posted a two-part series of videos. You can watch them in any order. My First Form: Build a Simple PowerShell GUI App is a step-by-step guide to building a little PowerShell GUI app that displays the versions of Windows and Windows PowerShell on your system. My First Form: Controls and Properties is like a prequel. It introduces you to the concepts of the Windows Forms controls…   More »

PowerShell GUI Apps: Why think in events?

Monday, January 4th, 2016 by June Blender
Always committed to starting the New Year right, I’m heading to Scottsdale, Arizona on Tuesday, January 5 at 5:30 PM to meet with the newly revived Arizona PowerShell User Group. We’ll meet at the Microsoft Store in Scottsdale Fashion Square. (I will not be distracted by the Surface Pro 4 on display. I will not…)   I’ll be there to lead an interactive hands-on lab in which participants build a basic PowerShell GUI application – essentially, a graphic user interface for a PowerShell script. When you press a button, it runs part of the script. When you type text in…   More »

Output from a Script in an Executable File

Thursday, December 17th, 2015 by June Blender
This is the fourth blog in a multi-part series about designing a Windows PowerShell script that will be packaged in an executable file. Passing Parameters to a Script in an Executable File explains how to use the special parsing features of PowerShell Studio and PrimalScript to make passing parameters easy for PowerShell users and authors. Parsing Parameters for a Script in an Executable File explains how to parse parameters manually for special uses. Displaying Help for a Script in an Executable File explains how to display help for a script in an executable file. Output from a Script in an…   More »

Spotlight on the Label Control

Wednesday, December 16th, 2015 by June Blender
The Spotlight on Controls series describes the controls, that is, the objects in the System.Windows.Forms namespace, so you can use them effectively when building GUI apps in PowerShell Studio and PrimalScript. Each post focuses on one control and lists its most important properties, methods, and events, including the default event that PowerShell Studio adds to your script when you double-click the control. The posts include many examples written in Windows PowerShell, so you can use them right away. Read more: Spotlight on Controls: Common properties and methods This post describes the Label control. Label Control [System.Windows.Forms.Label] Creates a clickable text…   More »

Create a PowerShell GUI App with a Fixed-Size UI

Thursday, December 3rd, 2015 by June Blender
The newest video in our "Check out this feature" series is actually an answer to a great question that was posed to me on Reddit. A PowerShell GUI with a Fixed-Size UI shows you how to use the features of PowerShell Studio to create a PowerShell GUI app that the end-user cannot resize.   A fixed-size UI is much simpler to manage because you don't have to anchor the form controls or worry about them floating around the form when the user resizes the UI.  In this video, I demonstrate 3 different ways to do it. You can also create a…   More »

Passing Parameters to a Script in an Executable File

Monday, November 30th, 2015 by June Blender
This is the first blog in a multi-part series about designing a Windows PowerShell script that will be packaged in an executable file. Passing Parameters to a Script in an Executable File explains how to use the special parsing features of PowerShell Studio and PrimalScript to make passing parameters easy for PowerShell users and authors. Parsing Parameters for a Script in an Executable File explains how to parse parameters manually for special uses. Displaying Help for a Script in an Executable File explains how to display help for a script in an executable file. Output from a Script in an…   More »

Typing Enter Pushes a Button

Monday, August 17th, 2015 by June Blender
As a beginner developer of PowerShell GUIs, I'm always looking for easy ways to make my simple applications more sophisticated and usable. One of the basic usability features in most applications is typing <Enter> in a textbox to invoke a function instead of clicking a Start, Go, or OK button. In this post, I'll show you two ways to do it. One technique is significantly simpler than the other, but works only when there is exactly one "Go" button. The more complex technique works for multiple buttons and keys other than <Enter>. Registering a KeyDown Event Handler Let's start with…   More »